Port Patrick

Light's of the Southwest Coast of Scotland

In Salutem Omnium
For the Safety of All
Holy Isle near Arran
Flag of Scotland
© Composted by:
Bob Schrage
updated: 02-01-2019

Davaar



Davaar Island or Island Davaar (Scottish Gaelic: Eilean Dà Bhàrr) is located at the mouth of Campbeltown Loch off the east coast of Kintyre, in Argyll and Bute, Scotland. It is a tidal island, linked to the mainland by a natural shingle causeway called the Dhorlin near Campbeltown at low tide. The crossing can be made in around 40 minutes.

Davaar was known as the island of Sanct Barre between the years 1449 to 1508. The modern form Davaar is from older Do Bharre - thy St Barre. Dr Gillies in his "Place Names of Argyll" appears to accept the popular derivation, Double-pointed (Da-Bharr) Island.

Davaar Island is one of 43 tidal islands that can be walked to from the mainland of Great Britain and one of 17 that can be walked to from the Scottish mainland.In 2001 the island had a population of 2 as recorded by the census but in 2011 there were no "usual residents" living there.

In 1854, a Lighthouse was built on the north of the island by the lighthouse engineers David and Thomas Stevenson. The lighthouse was automated in 1983, and today, Davaar is inhabited by caretakers, sheep, goats and mink.

One and one third acres of ground were purchased to build the lighthouse and buildings which were estimated to cost between £3,000 and £4,000. The Contractor responsible for the building was John Barr & Co. James Milne & Son made the lantern and the leadwork was made by John Marshall.

The Lookout, a square building standing on a small knoll close to the lighthouse, was built during World War Two to house naval crews, whose task it was to stretch anti-submarine nets across the water, protecting Campbeltown. It is now rented out as a holiday home.

A revolving white light was though to be the best possible distinction for Davaar and the character in 1854 was one flash every ½ minute. The light used a mercury vapour lamp in conjunction with catoptric mirrors driven by clockwork machinery. The station had a secomac electric siren fog signal with flap value shutters.

It should be noted that at some sites the Northern Lighthouse Board have sold some redundant buildings within the lighthouse complex and are not responsible for the maintenance of these building.

Davaar Cave

Davaar Cave Entrance to the cave containing Archibald MacKinnon's painting. The island is also known for its seven caves, one of which contains a life size cave painting depicting the crucifixion, painted in 1887 by local artist Archibald MacKinnon after he had a vision in a dream suggesting him to do so. The painting caused uproar in the area as it was seen as a sign from God; it is said that when the townsfolk discovered it was MacKinnon, and not God, he was exiled from the town indefinitely. Restored several times since, including twice by the original artist, the painting was vandalised in July 2006, having a red and black depiction of Che Guevara painted over the original masterpiece. It has since been restored again.

Davaar was known as the island of Sanct Barre, 1449 -1508. The modern form Davaar is from older Do Bharre - thy St Barre. Dr Gillies in his "Place Names of Argyll" appears to accept the popular derivation, Double-pointed (Da-Bharr) Island. Davaar, situated at the mouth of Campbeltown Loch, is an Island only at high tide. It is linked to the mainland by the Dhorlin, a bank of shingle which can be crossed at low tide. One and one third acres of ground were purchased to build the lighthouse and buildings which were estimated to cost between £3,000 and £4,000. The Contractor responsible for the building was John Barr & Co. James Milne & Son made the lantern and the leadwork was made by John Marshall. A revolving white light was though to be the best possible distinction for Davaar and the character in 1854 was one flash every ½ minute. The light used a mercury vapour lamp in conjunction with catoptric mirrors driven by clockwork machinery. The station had a secomac electric siren fog signal with flap value shutters. The light was automated in 1983. It should be noted that at some sites the Northern Lighthouse Board have sold some redundant buildings within the lighthouse complex and are not responsible for the maintenance of these building.

A4276

Character: Fl(2) W 10s 37m 15M
(fl. 0.3s - ec. 1.7s)

EngineerDavid Lillie Stevenson (1815-1886)
Thomas Stevenson (1818-1887)

Lat, Lon55°25.688' N, 05°32.428' W

Established1854
Automated1983
Character Flashing(2) White every 10 secs.
Range27.8 km / 15 nM
Tower20 meters, 80 steps to top of the tower
Elevation37 meters above sealevel
Fog horn2 blasts every 20 secs.
Secomac electric with flap value shutters

StatusOperationel
AuthorityNorthern Lighthouse Board
RemarksCandel power 300.000 cd
Cat.B listed - nr: 4920 - 28/08/1980

Davaar lighthouse
Davaar lighthouse
Davaar map
Davaar map
References:

xxxxx- xxxxx