Neist Point

Lighthouses of the Inner Hebrides

In Salutem Omnium
For the Safety of All
Neist Point - Isle of Skye
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© Composted by:
Bob Schrage
updated: 06-01-2019

Kyleakin lighthouse



Description D & T Stevenson, 1857. 70ft circular tower supporting light on rocky promontory, linked to keepers' houses by 5-span, plate-iron access bridge and concrete causeway. Single-storey pair of former keepers' houses, white harled with contrasting margins. Statement of Special Interest The Kyleakin Lighthouse is a fine example of its type, prominent located on the small island of Eilean Ban in the Kyle of Lochalsh. Built in 1857 by renowned Scottish lighthouse designers David and Thomas Stevenson, it was one of the first of its kind to use a fixed condensing light. It became automated in 1960 at which time it was converted to run on acetylene gas. The lighthouse is linked by access bridge and causeway to a pair of single-storey, back-to-back, former keepers' houses. The island was bought by author and naturalist Gavin Maxwell in 1963 and the keeper's houses were more recently restored as a warden's residence and museum. The lighthouse was decommissioned in 1993. The island now acts as a support for the Skye Road Bridge, completed in 1995. Formerly listed as 'Kyle Lighthouse, Eilean Ban'; address amended 2010.

Description D & T Stevenson, 1857. 70ft circular tower supporting light on rocky promontory, linked to keepers' houses by 5-span, plate-iron access bridge and concrete causeway. Single-storey pair of former keepers' houses, white harled with contrasting margins. Statement of Special Interest The Kyleakin Lighthouse is a fine example of its type, prominent located on the small island of Eilean Ban in the Kyle of Lochalsh. Built in 1857 by renowned Scottish lighthouse designers David and Thomas Stevenson, it was one of the first of its kind to use a fixed condensing light. It became automated in 1960 at which time it was converted to run on acetylene gas. The lighthouse is linked by access bridge and causeway to a pair of single-storey, back-to-back, former keepers' houses. The island was bought by author and naturalist Gavin Maxwell in 1963 and the keeper's houses were more recently restored as a warden's residence and museum. The lighthouse was decommissioned in 1993. The island now acts as a support for the Skye Road Bridge, completed in 1995. Kyleakin Lighthouse is situated at the south-western end of Eilean Bàn. It was built by David and Thomas Stevenson in 1857, and is linked to a pair of keepers' houses. The lighthouse was automated and converted to use acetylene gas in 1960. Following the start of construction of the Skye Bridge, the lighthouse was decommissioned in 1993. It is a Category B listed building. The 70 foot tall lighthouse, designed by David (1815-81) and Thomas (1818-87) Stevenson, was built in 1857. Thomas Stevenson was the father of the author Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-94). When first built the light itself was fuelled by sperm whale oil, and displayed a central white beam flanked by a red and a green beam. It was not until 1898 that the lamp was converted to a paraffin vapour system, with Eilean Bàn holding the storage tanks for the paraffin. These tanks were refuelled by a tripod housing a fuel valve, on the shore. A large mooring hook is still present beyond the tripod and can be seen from the path going along the north side of the island. A similar arrangement is present on the coast facing Kyleakin. The refuelling points were placed on the north and south sides of the island as a greater depth of water on those sides allowed the larger boats to berth. lighthouseLighthouse_and_Pier Acetylene gas was a much cleaner fuel and did not require constant pressurisation. In 1960 the lamp was converted to Acetylene gas so the lighthouse no longer needed to be manned all the time. With the departure of the full-time keepers, the island cottages were then put up for sale by the owners, the Northern Lighthouse board. The lighthouse was finally decommissioned in 1993. The channel into Loch Alsh was then marked by the large red and green buoys that can be seen running east and west from the lighthouse. After decommissioning the lighthouse was denoted as a day mark, which means that it remains a landmark that it is used for navigation during the day, and must therefore continue to be kept in good condition.

AXXXX?

Character: (discont.)

EngineerDavid Lillie Stevenson (1815-1886)
EngineerThomas Stevenson (1818-1887)

Lat, Lon57°16.662' N, 05°44.550' W

Established1857
Automated1971
CharacterFlashing(2) White every 30 secs.
Range?? km / ?? NM
Tower21 meters
Elevation44 meters above sea level
Fog hornNo

StatusDeactivated 1993
AuthorityEilean Ban Trust
RemarksCat.B listed - nr: 6994 - 25/03/1971

Kyleakin lighthouse
Kyleakin lighthouse
Kyleakin map
Kyleakin map
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